Life’s a Trip – When Work is Play

This is the 4th in the Life’s a Trip series.

The American Dream isn’t always what it’s cracked up to be.  A house with a two-car garage and a nice yard in the suburbs is not what everybody wants.  In middle class America sometimes it is assumed that we will raise our kids to go to the right school to get the right degree to land the right job, find the right spouse, and raise the right family – who will do it all over again.

That’s fine if it is what you want, but very often middle-agers wake up one morning and discover they are tired of working the job, tired of paying the mortgage, and tired of weeding and feeding and mowing those relentless lawns.

They suddenly realize that maybe they are living somebody else’s dream.

I think the best case scenario is when young people don’t assume that life has to be lived in a certain way – before they rack up all that college debt, mortgage debt and credit card debt that seems to go with the status quo.

If you like what you are doing, it is more like play than like work.  You can work 9 to 5 and love it and go home at the end of the day refreshed.

But if you have become weary of the rat race, maybe it is time to look for a change.

I loved my first 20 years of school teaching.  But after that, it started to get old.  I had a different roster of students every year, but the same age-appropriate behaviors.  My school board offered an early buy-out for experienced (top of the pay scale) teachers, and I went for it.

To change things up a bit I took a leave of absence during my 19th year of teaching and took my family to a foreign country to teach at an international school. What a trip!

It was actually too early for me to retire, and I had always wanted to work more with my hands; I took the chance to start a log home construction company that employed a mobile crew of carpenters who built new log homes all over the state of Michigan.  I had a wonderful crew of workers, and I loved getting up every morning and going to work.

I had my second wind and was living my second dream for the next 8 years.

Two of my carpenters were positioning a porch post of a new log home up north.

Then the housing market in Michigan collapsed and there wasn’t any more work.  I had to lay off the crew.

Okay then, my next dream had been to operate a business in barn recycling and again I went for it.  I rented a huge forklift and dismantled unwanted barns, hiring a couple of helpers to de-nail and sort the materials.  I sold a lot of the boards, and constructed furniture from the vintage material to sell on the side.  I even constructed several rustic log cabins that I sold online and shipped across the country.

I was having fun again.

I built this deacons bench starting with an old barn loft door and building it forward from there.
This log cabin from old barn beams was sold on eBay and shipped to North Carolina.

Then we got the epic idea to sell our property and hit the road full-time in a 29-foot RV.  Oh, the places we went!  Surf this blog and you will see an amazing variety of places we experienced over several years.

We visited 49 states and drove the Alaska Highway with our truck and RV.

But after a while, we found the downside of that too.  We missed the kids and the grandkids when we were down south for those long winters.

And now we are pursuing the next wild dream.  We have bought a historical house, a fixer-upper in the city and started ripping down old wallpaper and plaster.

More fun!

I can’t wait to get into the upstairs rooms of the old place with a paint brush!

___________________________

I think we all wise up as we get older.  Well, most of us do.  We develop a philosophy of life as we go.  And I guess this post is about ideology as much as it’s about a timeline of my life.

As much as it is possible, I think we should seek to do the things we enjoy.  Somebody said to use your resources to buy experiences, not just stuff.

If the old job has become monotonous, maybe we should change directions.  It is not always easy, and it doesn’t always happen right away.  When I wanted to get out of teaching, I started to work toward getting my builder’s license three years before the next retirement buy-out was offered by my school district allowing me to retire and start collecting a pension.

If change is not possible, I would look for ways to adapt my lifestyle to make it more enjoyable.  It’s calling living for the weekend, and millions live life this way, but it is better than hating every day of your existence.

A final word:  Sometimes the things we enjoy are not obvious.  We have to try things out in order to discover our passion.  It can take years, it can take decades to find the fun.  Shoot, it can take a lifetime of happily skipping from one thing to the next.

This too:  Sometimes the passion will change.  Some things just run their course.  When a door closes, be a good finisher… and move on.

And then you can be off to try out the next new thing.

Oh, yeah, there was this too: We also owned a Christmas tree farm for about 20 years.

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